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Do you wonder what people mean by "DEI"–diversity, equity and inclusion? Do you want to feel more comfortable talking about race, gender, class, sexual orientation, and/or migration? Are you wondering why or how your organization should take part in discussions of privilege?

Northeast Oregon Economic Development District (NEOEDD) brings two different events to explore DEI topics:

NEOEDD continues its roundtable discussions for volunteers, boards, and staff members to learn, share, and discuss DEI methods and strategies. The next roundtable will be held Wednesday, Aug. 1 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at The Place, 301 S Lake St. in Joseph, and be moderated by Anita Yap and Traci Price. The cost to attend is $25 per person and includes lunch. Scholarships are available; please inquire at NEOEDD, 541-426-3598. Register here.

 

Second, NEOEDD is hosting the Oregon Humanities Conversation Project "Race and Place: Racism and Resilience in Oregon's Past and Future," led by Anita Yap and Traci Price, at 7 p.m. in Wallowa County at The Place, 301 S Lake St. in Joseph, on Tuesday, July 31, and in La Grande at hq, 112 Depot St., on Aug. 1. These events are free of charge; no registration required.

In the Conversation Projects, Yap and Price posit: Oregonians envision a future that includes communities built on values of diversity, equity, and inclusion. At the same time, we live in a society that marginalizes and excludes people of color. How does Oregon’s history of racism influence our present and how can understanding historic and current impacts of racism in Oregon contribute to our sense of place and vision of the future? How can diversity and inclusion create thriving communities?

Anita Yap is the founding partner of the Multicultural Collaborative, a small business consulting group that provides strategies and services to nonprofits, local governments, and businesses to engage with diverse communities for equity, capacity building, community visioning, urban design, and public policy advocacy. Anita is an active community member and serves on the Jade International District Steering Committee, the Board of Governors for the City Club of Portland, and the Regional Arts and Culture Council Board.

Traci Price has worked in the environmental nonprofit sector for most of her career, with a focus on education and youth. She spearheaded the No Oregon Child Left Inside Act in 2008 and was appointed in 2010 by Gov. Kulongoski to lead development of the Oregon Environmental Literacy Plan. Traci owns a consulting business and works with the Multicultural Collaborative, a consulting group that helps organizations and businesses engage with diverse communities for equity and capacity building. She prioritizes projects at the intersection of education, environment, and racial justice.

Future roundtables are scheduled for Nov. 7, 2018, and Feb. 6, 2019.

This program is available thanks to a grant from Meyer Memorial Trust.
The Northeast Oregon Economic Development District’s mission is to provide resources and facilitate quality decision-making for the benefit of entrepreneurs, businesses and communities in Baker, Union, and Wallowa counties. Learn more about its programs and business support at www.neoedd.org.

# # #

19 Jul 2018, 10:34 am

Back by popular demand: the four-part "GrantReady" workshop series provides organizational development and grant-writing training with tools and skills needed to help nonprofits become more competitive for grant funding, and better prepared to operate and evaluate their programs and projects. NEOEDD offers this series at IGNITE, 104 Depot St. in La Grande, on Mondays, Aug. 6 to 27, from 10:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Register here.

GrantReady consists of four Monday training sessions for board, staff members, and volunteers of nonprofit organizations. Topics include:
• Organizational and project budgeting
• Components of a grant proposal
• Funding plan
• Evaluation methods
• Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI)
• Board relations
• Foundation site visits
• Grant reporting
Lunch will be provided. The cost for the four-part series is $100 for the first participant from each nonprofit, with a discounted rate of $50 for each additional participant. A limited number of scholarships are available; contact Lisa Dawson if interested.

“Participants will also meet staff from several foundations who will provide insights into their organizations and what they are looking for in a grant proposal,” says NEOEDD Executive Director Lisa Dawson. “This is a great opportunity for participants to begin to make personal contacts in the nonprofit world.”

What past participants have said about GrantReady:
• “Learning about the different types of grants, (i.e., “Capacity Building,” etc.) was invaluable. Learning the correct budget submission for a grant proposal. Learning about “In-Kind” costs to add to the budget package. Really, there is so much I learned from your class that I can’t praise it enough. I could not learn this same information any other way.”
• “The resource packets are phenomenally helpful.”
• "I really appreciated the focus on Diversity, Equity and Inclusivity as an integral part of the grant application process."
• “I benefited from listening to other nonprofits in the class as they discussed their issues. Priceless.”
• “The feedback on my grant proposal was invaluable. What a terrific opportunity to learn exactly what a grantor is looking for gives me confidence that I can propose a successful grant package.”
• “All of the slides and handouts are going in my permanent files. Their content is excellent in directing my energy in the right direction. And I really appreciate the resources.”
• "Thank you for teaching a workshop that was grounded in principles of inclusivity and broad in the scope of skills that it provided."

This program is available thanks to a grant from Meyer Memorial Trust.

19 Jul 2018, 10:33 am

Do you wonder what do people mean by "DEI"–diversity, equity and inclusion?

Do you want to feel more comfortable talking about race, gender, class, sexual orientation, and/or
migration?

Are you wondering why or how your organization should take part in discussions of privilege?

Join a dynamic, interactive roundtable with Alai Reyes-Santos, who will lead a discussion that about people and change in Northeast Oregon. Meet other organization leaders and community volunteers willing to have the hard conversations that are needed to build a better future for everyone.

 

  • May 1 The Place, 301 S Lake St., Joseph  Register here
  • May 2 HatchLab Baker, 2019 A Main St., Baker City  Register here

 

Cost is $25, which includes lunch. Scholarships are available; please inquire at NEOEDD, 541-426-3598.

Future roundtable dates are Aug. 1 (Location in Wallowa County TBD) and Nov. 7, 2018, and Feb. 6, 2019. Details forthcoming.

 

Dr. Alaí Reyes-Santos is an associate professor of ethnic studies at the University of Oregon. She is an award-winning scholar, and writer on race, gender, and migration studies, recently earning the 2015 Ersted Award for Distinguished Teaching. She has led workshops and served as a consultant on issues of equity and inclusion for the Inter-American Commission of Human Rights,
Northwest Youth Corps, Pearl Buck Center, Nonprofit Association of Oregon, School Garden Project, and Centro Bono (Dominican Republic).

This program is offered with support from Meyer Memorial Trust.

2 May 2018, 11:45 am

In Enterprise, Baker City, and La Grande

 

Northeast Oregon Economic Development District (NEOEDD) offers a free, six-week workshop series to help entrepreneurs and small-business owners build the basis for a successful enterprise. Register by Apr. 9 to reserve your seat in Enterprise, Baker City, or La Grande. But, don’t wait—class size is limited!

Lisa Dawson has taught the Business Foundations workshop series for more than ten years, and her students—existing and aspiring entrepreneurs in Baker, Union and Wallowa counties—continue to give her rave reviews. This hands-on class covers the basics of running a successful business: overhead and variable costs, goal-setting and sales projections, marketing, and other considerations, and brings it all together in a business plan.

Best of all, thanks to a Community Development Block Grant through the City of La Grande, the classes are offered free of charge!

Workshops take place from 6 to 9 p.m:

• Enterprise: Thursdays – April 19, 26, and May 3, 17, 24, 31 at Wallowa Resources, 401 NE 1st St.
• La Grande: Tuesdays – April 17, 24, and May 1, 8, 22, 29 at TBD
• Baker City: Mondays – April 9, 16, 23, 30, and May 7, 21 at HatchLab Baker, 2019 Main St.

To register, call NEOEDD by Monday, Apr. 9, at 541-426-3598 or 800-645-9454, or email kristyathens@neoedd.org. Preference is made to people with low-to-moderate incomes; income verification is required.

The workshops last six weeks, with the following topics:
• Gaining Perspective: View business concept from a high altitude in order to define vision, set priorities, and get a good look at the main topics to be addressed.
• Laying the Foundation: Define line of business and analyze financial essentials, from overhead costs to break-even points.
• Getting into the Flow: Cover the financial bases of cash flow, sales forecasting, and financial documents.
• Mission & Markets: Revisit mission, discuss market research, identify and assess competitors, and target markets.
• Get the Word Out: Discuss creative marketing strategies and give peer feedback on product, or marketing materials.
• Goodbye & Good Luck: Present business plans and generate next steps.

Here’s what former class participants have to say about the Foundations class:
• “[I appreciated Lisa’s] low-key and helpful attitude, and her desire to help each of us regardless of our business choices.” –Participant in Halfway
• “I hadn’t looked at break-even point, overhead costs, and marketing costs before this class.” –Participant in Enterprise
• “[I valued] being able to get a grasp on my business intentions and the necessary work involved to be successful.” –Participant in Baker City

20 Apr 2018, 11:56 am

NEOEDD offers GrantReady on Saturdays, April 7-28, from 10:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., at HatchLab Baker, 2019 A Main St. in Baker City.

The four-part "GrantReady" workshop series provides organizational development and grant-writing training with tools and skills needed to help nonprofits become more competitive for grant funding, and better prepared to operate and evaluate their programs and projects.

GrantReady consists of four Saturday training sessions for volunteers and staff members of nonprofit organizations. Topics include:
• Organizational and project budgeting
• Components of a grant proposal
• Funding plan
• Evaluation methods
• Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI)
• Board relations
• Foundation site visits
• Grant reporting
Lunch will be provided. The cost for the four-part series is $100 for the first participant from each nonprofit, with a discounted rate of $50 for each additional participant. A limited number of scholarships are available; contact Lisa Dawson (lisadawson@neoedd.org) if interested. Registration link here.

“Participants will also meet staff from several foundations who will provide insights into their organizations and what they are looking for in a grant proposal,” says NEOEDD Executive Director Lisa Dawson. “This is a great opportunity for participants to begin to make personal contacts in the nonprofit world.”

What past participants have said about GrantReady:
• “Learning about the different types of grants, (i.e., “Capacity Building,” etc.) was invaluable. Learning the correct budget submission for a grant proposal. Learning about “In-Kind” costs to add to the budget package. Really, there is so much I learned from your class that I can’t praise it enough. I could not learn this same information any other way.”
• “The resource packets are phenomenally helpful.”
• "I really appreciated the focus on Diversity, Equity and Inclusivity as an integral part of the grant application process."
• “I benefited from listening to other nonprofits in the class as they discussed their issues. Priceless.”
• “The feedback on my grant proposal was invaluable. What a terrific opportunity to learn exactly what a grantor is looking for gives me confidence that I can propose a successful grant package.”
• “All of the slides and handouts are going in my permanent files. Their content is excellent in directing my energy in the right direction. And I really appreciate the resources.”
• "Thank you for teaching a workshop that was grounded in principles of inclusivity and broad in the scope of skills that it provided."

This program is available thanks to a grant from Meyer Memorial Trust.

6 Apr 2018, 10:41 am

The most powerful and successful communities are those whose citizens are engaged in what’s going on around them. Let’s keep building Northeast Oregon’s strength by getting involved in regional economic planning.

NEOEDD compiles a new Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy—affectionately known as the “CEDS”—every five years (with annual updates). 2018 is a CEDS revision year, so NEOEDD has been working hard to engage civic leaders in visioning exercises. Now, it’s your turn! Please join us for a public meeting in your county, and share your opinions via our anonymous survey.

Led by NEOEDD, local leaders in business health care, education, natural resources, and government have explored their hopes for and concerns about Northeast Oregon’s economy. A key finding discovered at a discussion in late January was the need for more collaboration across county lines in order to diversify the economy and provide better paying jobs for the region. The importance of involving people of different backgrounds, cultures and ages in planning for the region’s future was also highlighted.

To gather more perspectives on how best to improve quality of life in NE Oregon, NEOEDD is hosting a public forum in Wallowa/Union/Baker County and an anonymous online survey. People who enjoy gathering to share food and ideas are invited to attend the forums. Fun and facilitated activities will inform participants about the region’s current economy, and gather input on strategies to provide for jobs, education, housing, and other essentials needed to support a healthy economy. Free! Refreshments will be provided. RSVPs are not required but are appreciated (541-426-3598), so we don’t run out of food!

Forum schedule:
Baker County
Wed., Feb. 28
Baker County Events Center
5:30-8:30 p.m.

Wallowa County
Wed., Mar. 7
Community Connections
5:30-8:30 p.m.

Union County
Wed., Mar. 14
Blue Mountain Conference Center
5:30-8:30 p.m.

People are also invited to complete the Northeast Oregon Strategy Survey, here. Please respond by Mar. 21.

Those of us in government and economic development do not—and don’t want to—work in a vacuum. We need your input! We look forward to hearing from you.

16 Mar 2018, 11:41 am

NEOEDD outreach specialist, Kristy Athens, worked on a food hub feasibility study for Wallowa County in 2017, thanks to a grant from Meyer Memorial Trust. Download it here.

2 Mar 2018, 12:02 pm

Rural Oregon's nonprofit organizations are exploring how diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) can build understanding, strengthen mission impact, and ensure public benefit. To this end, NEOEDD is organizing a series of roundtable discussions for regional nonprofit board members and staff to learn, share, and discuss DEI methods and strategies. The next roundtable will be held Feb. 7, 2018; others are planned for May 2, Aug. 1, and Nov. 7, 2018, and Feb. 6, 2019.

The Feb. 7 session will be held at the Island City Hall, 10605 Island Ave., from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., including lunch. The title is “LGBTQ 101,” and will be led by Meg Bowen (pictured, with dog Sparky), quality director at Winding Waters Clinic in Enterprise, and Stef Duncan and Kyrie Weaver of Safe Harbors in Enterprise. Bowen has worked in health care and primary care for more than 30 years and is a Pacific Northwest native. Duncan has worked as a domestic violence and sexual assault victims’ advocate for the past eight years, the last three of which as an LGBTQ-specific advocate in Wallowa County.

Sessions in October and December of last year focused on assessing an organization's progress in addressing DEI generally, within programs and at the governance level. The February roundtable focuses on a specific element of DEI: how denying human rights to the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or queer members of our community not only threatens those individuals in obvious ways, but is also detrimental to everyone in the community.

"A community that is not safe for all of its members isn’t safe for any of its members," notes Bowen. "This roundtable will offer history and also present-day implications of fear and bigotry."

The cost to attend is $25 per person per roundtable discussion. Scholarships are available; please inquire at NEOEDD, 541-426-3598. Registration here.

This program is available thanks to a grant from Meyer Memorial Trust.

9 Feb 2018, 1:04 pm

In today’s competitive global market, it is necessary for regions to have a long-term economic development strategy that can serve as a roadmap to progress and prosperity. The Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy (CEDS) does just that.  It is a locally-based, regionally-driven economic development planning process that engages community leaders, private sector partners, and other stakeholders in planning for our region’s future.    
The CEDS planning process creates a forum for the region to identify its strengths and weaknesses and brings together diverse partners to create living-wage jobs and livable communities, diversify the economy, and spur economic growth. An effective CEDS allows a region to maximize its potential, as well as engage with the US Economic Development Administration (EDA) and other federal partners to receive infrastructure and technical assistance grants, such as EDA’s Public Works and Economic Adjustment Assistance programs. Overall, an effective CEDS identifies locally-grown strategies that will guide regional economic development, encourage partnerships and collaboration, and improve economic outcomes and overall quality of life in our region. The planning process results in a document that is shared in the region and available to the public via NEOEDD’s website: http://www.neoedd.org/content/comprehensive-plan.
We have identified two different ways to participate in the planning process, and invite you to participate in either or both of them.
1.       Provide input on a few surveys that NEOEDD will be distributing to obtain perspectives and ideas from the community. The purpose of the first survey, the longest of the surveys, is to identify the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats facing the region. We are currently collecting responses to this survey here. Subsequent surveys will be used to help us identify projects and priorities for further development or implementation.
2.       Join us at local public input meetings that will be held in Baker, Union and Wallowa counties. If you’d like to participate in a discussion and provide input, attend a public meeting, which will be held in February and/or March. If you provide your e-mail address to lisadawson@neoedd.org, we will notify you of the dates and times of these meetings.
Please provide your input on the SWOT survey by January 5, 2018.

9 Feb 2018, 1:04 pm

In today’s competitive global market, it is necessary for regions to have a long-term economic development strategy that can serve as a roadmap to progress and prosperity. The Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy (CEDS) does just that.  It is a locally-based, regionally-driven economic development planning process that engages community leaders, private sector partners, and other stakeholders in planning for our region’s future.    

The CEDS planning process creates a forum for the region to identify its strengths and weaknesses and brings together diverse partners to create living-wage jobs and livable communities, diversify the economy, and spur economic growth. An effective CEDS allows a region to maximize its potential, as well as engage with the US Economic Development Administration (EDA) and other federal partners to receive infrastructure and technical assistance grants, such as EDA’s Public Works and Economic Adjustment Assistance programs. Overall, an effective CEDS identifies locally-grown strategies that will guide regional economic development, encourage partnerships and collaboration, and improve economic outcomes and overall quality of life in our region. The planning process results in a document that is shared in the region and available to the public via NEOEDD’s website: http://www.neoedd.org/content/comprehensive-plan.

We have identified two different ways to participate in the planning process, and invite you to participate in either or both of them.

1.       Provide input on a few surveys that NEOEDD will be distributing to obtain perspectives and ideas from the community. The purpose of the first survey, the longest of the surveys, is to identify the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats facing the region. We are currently collecting responses to this survey here. Subsequent surveys will be used to help us identify projects and priorities for further development or implementation.

2.       Join us at local public input meetings that will be held in Baker, Union and Wallowa counties. If you’d like to participate in a discussion and provide input, attend a public meeting, which will be held in February and/or March. If you provide your e-mail address to lisadawson@neoedd.org, we will notify you of the dates and times of these meetings.

Please provide your input on the SWOT survey by January 5, 2018.

9 Feb 2018, 1:04 pm